Thursday, June 9, 2011

Birthday Flower Gifts

Is someone you know celebrating their birthday? Then why not give them birthday flower gifts? Giving flowers has been a tradition that dates back centuries. Flowers are still the safest and perhaps most elegant gifts - you cannot go wrong.

Each month of the year is represented by flowers and a color scheme. Show the celebrant how much you care by giving him or her the flowers that correspond to his or her birth month.

For January, give white flowers. Carnations arranged in casual baskets are perfect. February's color is violet, so send a bouquet of violets and add a balloon! The color of March yellow is yellow, so send the celebrant some fresh jonquils.

April celebrants should receive pink flowers. Sweet peas would be great. If your recipient is a May celebrant, bring him or her some lilies of the valley. June celebrants mostly like the color red, so this is the time to give roses. Larkspurs, on the other hand, are perfect for July celebrants.

Yellow is back in for August. Gladiolus arranged beautifully will show your August celebrant that you care. Purple asters are perfect for September celebrants. October's color is feisty orange, so give the celebrant some calendulas. November celebrants, on the other hand, will surely appreciate a basket of chrysanthemums, and December celebrants will love a narcissus.

Some flower shops do not deliver on Sundays, so be sure to place an order by Friday and have the flowers delivered by Saturday if the celebration falls on a Sunday. If you are buying the flowers yourself, it is best to call the flower shop for an early reservation and drop by when the flowers are ready, preferably on the day of the celebration so that the flowers are still fresh when you get them. Lastly, remember that while there are rules on what specific flowers should given to a person celebrating a birthday in a specific month, you can always break them. Go for a nice mix of garden flowers or a dozen roses if you want to be different. The birthday celebrant will sure appreciate whatever you give, because everybody likes flowers.

Flower Gifts provides detailed information on Flower Gifts, Flower Gift Baskets, Thanksgiving Flower Gifts, Birthday Flower Gifts and more. Flower Gifts is affiliated with New York Flower District.

Article Source:

Friday, May 6, 2011

Basic Facts About Online Flower Delivery Service

Basic Facts About Online Flower Delivery Service
By Claire Shawne

Online flower delivery service is a shopping option that allows you to view and order products through the Internet. Instead of the usual way of purchasing flowers by visiting the local florist, online shopping for flowers will only require you access to the Internet. You do not have to endure long hours in the flower shop looking for the perfect flower bunch. You will just have to sit, view sites, and make a few clicks.

Through online flower delivery, preset delivery times can be scheduled to provide timely shipment without the hassle of daily ordering. Many floristry shops, small stores, and specialty shops can purchase floral items wholesale by ordering from sources that transport directly from their warehouses. Online sources that buy directly from wholesale distributors obtain cut rate prices and transfer their savings on to customers or other small companies.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

online flower shop

online flower shop
flower delivery service,deliver flowers,buy flower online,flowers pictures gallery,online flower shop

Sunday, April 17, 2011

telefloras sunny day pitcher:flower 2011 april

flower 2011 april
Picture someone receiving this sunny pitcher of daisies! It's so bright and full of warmth, it's guaranteed to make them smile. Besides being the perfect bouquet for any occasion, the dazzling yellow ceramic pitcher can be used and enjoyed for years to come.

Let's hear it for yellow spray roses and cheerful yellow and white daisy spray chrysanthemums plus solidago delivered in an exclusive keepsake vase.

flower 2011 april

Approximately 14" W x 16" H.

* As Shown : T139-1A
* Deluxe : T139-1B
* Premium : T139-1C

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Symbolism flower

Many flowers have important symbolic meanings in Western culture. The practice of assigning meanings to flowers is known as floriography. Some of the more common examples include:

* Red roses are given as a symbol of love, beauty, and passion.
* Poppies are a symbol of consolation in time of death. In the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia and Canada, red poppies are worn to commemorate soldiers who have died in times of war.
* Irises/Lily are used in burials as a symbol referring to "resurrection/life". It is also associated with stars (sun) and its petals blooming/shining.
* Daisies are a symbol of innocence.

Flowers within art are also representative of the female genitalia, as seen in the works of artists such as Georgia O'Keeffe, Imogen Cunningham, Veronica Ruiz de Velasco, and Judy Chicago, and in fact in Asian and western classical art. Many cultures around the world have a marked tendency to associate flowers with femininity.

The great variety of delicate and beautiful flowers has inspired the works of numerous poets, especially from the 18th-19th century Romantic era. Famous examples include William Wordsworth's I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud and William Blake's Ah! Sun-Flower.

Because of their varied and colorful appearance, flowers have long been a favorite subject of visual artists as well. Some of the most celebrated paintings from well-known painters are of flowers, such as Van Gogh's sunflowers series or Monet's water lilies. Flowers are also dried, freeze dried and pressed in order to create permanent, three-dimensional pieces of flower art.

The Roman goddess of flowers, gardens, and the season of Spring is Flora. The Greek goddess of spring, flowers and nature is Chloris.

In Hindu mythology, flowers have a significant status. Vishnu, one of the three major gods in the Hindu system, is often depicted standing straight on a lotus flower.[13] Apart from the association with Vishnu, the Hindu tradition also considers the lotus to have spiritual significance.[14] For example, it figures in the Hindu stories of creation.[15]

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Chrysanthemum tea From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chrysanthemum tea (Chinese: 菊花茶, Pinyin: júhuā chá) is a flower-based tisane made from chrysanthemum flowers of the species Chrysanthemum morifolium or Chrysanthemum indicum, which are most popular in East Asia. To prepare the tea, chrysanthemum flowers (usually dried) are steeped in hot water (usually 90 to 95 degrees Celsius after cooling from a boil) in either a teapot, cup, or glass; often rock sugar is also added, and occasionally also wolfberries. The resulting drink is transparent and ranges from pale to bright yellow in color, with a floral aroma. In Chinese tradition, once a pot of chrysanthemum tea has been drunk, hot water is typically added again to the flowers in the pot (producing a tea that is slightly less strong); this process is often repeated several times.


Several varieties of chrysanthemum, ranging from white to pale or bright yellow in color, are used for tea. These include:

* Huángshān Gòngjú (黄山贡菊, literally "Yellow Mountain tribute chrysanthemum"); also called simply Gòngjú (贡菊)
* Hángbáijú (杭白菊), originating from Tongxiang, near Hangzhou; also called simply Hángjú, (杭菊)
* Chújú (滁菊), originating from the Chuzhou district of Anhui
* Bójú (亳菊), originating in the Bozhou district of Anhui

The flower is called gek huay in Thai. In Tamil it is called saamandhi.

Of these, the first two are most popular. Some varieties feature a prominent yellow flower head while others do not.

Chrysanthemum tea has many purported medicinal uses, including an aid in recovery from influenza, acne and as a "cooling" herb. According to traditional Chinese medicine the tea can aid in the prevention of sore throat and promote the reduction of fever. In Korea, it is known well for its medicinal use for making people more alert and is often used to waken themselves. In western herbal medicine, Chrysanthemum tea is drunk and used as a compress to treat circulatory disorders such as varicose veins and atherosclerosis.

In traditional Chinese medicine, chrysanthemum tea is also used to treat the eyes, and is said to clear the liver and the eyes. It is believed to be effective in treating eye pain associated with stress or yin/fluid deficiency. It is also used to treat blurring, spots in front of the eyes, diminished vision, and dizziness.[1] The liver is associated with the element Wood which rules the eyes and is associated with anger, stress, and related emotions.
[edit] Commercially available chrysanthemum tea

Although typically prepared at home, chrysanthemum tea is also available as a beverage in many Asian restaurants (particularly Chinese ones), and is also available from various drinks outlets in East Asia as well as Asian grocery stores outside Asia in canned or packed form. Due to its medicinal value, it may also be available at Traditional Chinese medicine outlets, often mixed with other ingredients.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Chrysanthemum indicum)
Jump to: navigation, search
Chrysanthemum sp
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Anthemideae
Genus: Chrysanthemum
Type species
Chrysanthemum indicum L.

Chrysanthemum aphrodite
Chrysanthemum arcticum
Chrysanthemum argyrophyllum
Chrysanthemum arisanense
Chrysanthemum boreale
Chrysanthemum chalchingolicum
Chrysanthemum chanetii
Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium
Chrysanthemum coronarium
Chrysanthemum crassum
Chrysanthemum glabriusculum
Chrysanthemum hypargyrum
Chrysanthemum indicum
Chrysanthemum japonense
Chrysanthemum japonicum
Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium
Chrysanthemum mawii
Chrysanthemum maximowiczii
Chrysanthemum mongolicum
Chrysanthemum morifolium
Chrysanthemum morii
Chrysanthemum okiense
Chrysanthemum oreastrum
Chrysanthemum ornatum
Chrysanthemum pacificum
Chrysanthemum potentilloides
Chrysanthemum segetum
Chrysanthemum shiwogiku
Chrysanthemum sinuatum
Chrysanthemum vestitum
Chrysanthemum weyrichii
Chrysanthemum yoshinaganthum
Chrysanthemum zawadskii

Chrysanthemums, often called mums or chrysanths, are of the genus (Chrysanthemum) constituting approximately 30 species of perennial flowering plants in the family Asteraceae which is native to Asia and northeastern Europe.


The name Chrysanthemum is derived from the Greek, chrysos (gold) and anthos (flower).[1]
In many countries, Chrysanthemums are a beautiful reminder that Autumn has arrived

The genus once included a larger number of species, but was split several decades ago into several genera. The naming of the genera has been contentious, but a ruling of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature in 1999 resulted in the defining species of the genus being changed to Chrysanthemum indicum, thereby restoring the economically important florist's chrysanthemum to the genus Chrysanthemum. During the period between the splitting of the genus and the ICBN ruling, these species have customarily been included under the genus name Dendranthema.

The other species previously included in the narrow view of the genus Chrysanthemum are now transferred to the genus Glebionis. The other genera separate from Chrysanthemum include Argyranthemum, Leucanthemopsis, Leucanthemum, Rhodanthemum, and Tanacetum.

Chrysanthemum are herbaceous perennial plants growing to 50–150 cm tall, with deeply lobed leaves with large flower heads that are generally white, yellow or pink in the wild and are the preferred diet of larvae of certain lepidoptera species — see list of Lepidoptera that feed on chrysanthemums.
Historical painting of Chrysanthemums from the New International Encyclopedia 1902.

Chrysanthemums were first cultivated in China as a flowering herb as far back as the 15th century BC.[2] An ancient Chinese city (Xiaolan Town of Zhongshan City) was named Ju-Xian, meaning "chrysanthemum city". The plant is particularly significant during the Double Ninth Festival. It is believed that the flower may have been brought to Japan in the 8th century CE[citation needed], and the Emperor adopted the flower as his official seal. There is a "Festival of Happiness" in Japan that celebrates the flower.

The flower was brought to Europe in the 17th century[citation needed]. Linnaeus named it from the Greek word χρυσός chrysous, "golden" (the colour of the original flowers), and ἄνθεμον -anthemon, meaning flower.
Economic uses
This article's tone or style may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. Specific concerns may be found on the talk page. See Wikipedia's guide to writing better articles for suggestions. (September 2010)
This article may be confusing or unclear to readers. Please help clarify the article; suggestions may be found on the talk page. (September 2010)
Ornamental uses

Modern chrysanthemums are much more showy than their wild relatives. The flowers occur in various forms, and can be daisy-like, decorative, pompons or buttons. This genus contains many hybrids and thousands of cultivars developed for horticultural purposes. In addition to the traditional yellow, other colors are available, such as white, purple, and red. The most important hybrid is Chrysanthemum × morifolium (syn. C. × grandiflorum), derived primarily from C. indicum but also involving other species.

Chrysanthemums are broken into two basic groups, Garden Hardy and Exhibition. Garden hardy mums are new perennials capable of being wintered over in the ground in most northern latitudes. Exhibition varieties are not usually as sturdy. Garden hardies are defined by their ability to produce an abundance of small blooms with little if any mechanical assistance (i.e., staking) and withstanding wind and rain. Exhibition varieties on the other hand require staking, over-wintering in a relatively dry cool environment, sometimes with the addition of night lights.

The Exhibition varieties can be used to create many amazing plant forms; Large disbudded blooms, spray forms, as well as many artistically trained forms, such as: Thousand Bloom, Standard (trees), Fans, Hanging Baskets, Topiary, Bonsai, and Cascades.

Chrysanthemum blooms are divided into 13 different bloom forms by the US National Chrysanthemum Society, Inc., which is in keeping with the international classification system. The bloom forms are defined by the way in which the ray and disk florets are arranged.

Chrysanthemum blooms are composed of many individual flowers (florets), each one capable of producing a seed. The disk florets are in the center of the bloom head, and the ray florets are on the perimeter. The ray florets are considered imperfect flowers, as they only possess the female productive organs, while the disk florets are considered perfect flowers as they possess both male and female reproductive organs.

Irregular Incurve: These are the giants of the chrysanthemum world. Quite often disbudded to create a single giant bloom (ogiku), the disk florets are completely concealed, while the ray florets curve inwardly to conceal the disk and also hang down to create a 'skirt'.

Reflex: The disk florets are concealed and the ray florets reflex outwards to create a mop like appearance.

Regular Incurve: Similar to the irregular incurves, only usually smaller blooms, with nearly perfect globular form. Disk florets are completely concealed. They used to be called 'Chinese'.

Decorative: Similar to reflex blooms without the mop like appearance. Disk florets are completely concealed, ray florets usually don't radiate at more than a 90 degree angle to the stem.

Intermediate Incurve: These blooms are in-between the Irregular and Regular incurves in both size and form. They usually have broader florets and a more loosely composed bloom. Again, the disk florets are completely concealed.

Pompon: *Note the spelling, it is not pompom. The blooms are fully double, of small size, and almost completely globular in form.

Single/Semi-Double: These blooms have completely exposed disk florets, with between 1 and 7 rows of ray florets, usually radiating at not more than a 90 degree angle to the stem.

Anemone: The disk florets are prominently featured, quite often raised and overshadowing the ray florets.

Spoon: The disk florets are visible and the long tubular ray florets are spatulate.

Quill: The disk florets are completely concealed, and the ray florets are tube like.

Spider: The disk florets are completely concealed, and the ray florets are tube like with hooked or barbed ends, hanging loosely around the stem.

Brush & Thistle: The disk florets may be visible. The ray florets are often tube like, and project all around the flower head, or project parallel to the stem.

Exotic: These blooms defy classification as they possess the attributes of more than one of the other twelve bloom types.

Chrysanthemum leaves resemble its close cousin, the mugwort weed — so much so that mugwort is sometimes called wild chrysanthemum — making them not always the first choice for professional gardeners.
Culinary uses

Yellow or white chrysanthemum flowers of the species C. morifolium are boiled to make a sweet drink in some parts of Asia. The resulting beverage is known simply as "chrysanthemum tea" (菊花茶, pinyin: júhuā chá, in Chinese). Chrysanthemum tea has many medicinal uses, including an aid in recovery from influenza. In Korea, a rice wine flavored with chrysanthemum flowers is called gukhwaju (국화주).photo 1photo 2

Chrysanthemum leaves are steamed or boiled and used as greens, especially in Chinese cuisine. Other uses include using the petals of chrysanthemum to mix with a thick snake meat soup (蛇羹) in order to enhance the aroma.
Insecticidal uses

Pyrethrum (Chrysanthemum [or Tanacetum] cinerariaefolium) is economically important as a natural source of insecticide. The flowers are pulverized, and the active components called pyrethrins, contained in the seed cases, are extracted and sold in the form of an oleoresin. This is applied as a suspension in water or oil, or as a powder. Pyrethrins attack the nervous systems of all insects, and inhibit female mosquitoes from biting. When not present in amounts fatal to insects, they still appear to have an insect repellent effect. They are harmful to fish, but are far less toxic to mammals and birds than many synthetic insecticides, except in consumer airborne backyard applications. They are non-persistent, being biodegradable and also breaking down easily on exposure to light. They are considered to be amongst the safest insecticides for use around food. (Pyrethroids are synthetic insecticides based on natural pyrethrum, e.g., permethrin.
Environmental uses

Chrysanthemum plants have been shown to reduce indoor air pollution by the NASA Clean Air Study.[3]
Medicinal uses

Extracts of Chrysanthemum plants (stem and flower) have been shown to have a wide variety of potential medicinal properties, including anti-HIV-1,[4][5] antibacterial[6] and antimycotic.[7]

Tuesday, March 8, 2011



The birth flower for March is daffodil. In the language of flowers, daffodils symbolize chivalry, respect, modesty and faithfulness.

Daffodils form a group of large-flowered members of the genus Narcissus. Most daffodils look yellow, but yellow-and-white, yellow-and-orange, white-and-orange, pink, and lime-green cultivars also exist. Daffodils grow perennially from bulbs. In temperate climates they flower among the earliest blooms in spring: to this extent daffodils both represent and herald spring. They often grow in large clusters, covering lawns and even entire hillsides with yellow.

Daffodils belong to the genus Narcissus. Daffodil is the common English name for them all, and Narcissus is the Latin, botanical name for them all. Some people refer to daffodils as "jonquils", from the Spanish name for the flower.

The name of the flower is derived from an earlier "affodell", a variant of asphodel. The reason for the introduction of the initial "d" is not known, though from at least the sixteenth century "Daffadown Dilly" or "daffadowndilly" has appeared as a playful synonym of the name. What a fancy March birth flower.
flower delivery
flower girl dresses
same day flower delivery
international flower delivery
flower arrangements
white flower farm
cheap flower delivery
flower delivery service
cheap flower girl dresses
wedding flower arrangements
flower girl baskets
flower shops
flower pots
flower girl shoes
flower girl dress
silk flower arrangements
passion flower
flower bulbs
flower seeds
flower girl gifts
flower deliveries
online flower delivery
flower hair accessories
funeral flower arrangements
online flower shop
flower bouquets
flower delivery usa
ivory flower girl dresses
wedding flower bouquets
flower arrangements centerpieces
flower arrangements for weddings
toddler flower girl dresses
send flower
flower vases
flower hair clips
passion flower extract
discount flower girl dresses
next day flower delivery
flower boxes
free flower delivery
flower girl dresses for less
phoenix flower shops
flower of the month club
infant flower girl dresses
discount flower delivery
flower gifts
plastic flower pots
cheapest flower delivery
flower coupons

Grab this Widget ~ Blogger Accessories